Witness for Life

Witness programs are presented to women & men in the community through local churches or other organizations.

Trained health instructors at each program teach and use special breast models to show the audience how they can check themselves for signs of breast cancer. The audience members then get a chance to practice what they’ve learned by searching for lumps in the models.

At the heart of the Witness Project are women who volunteer to talk to other women about the importance of early detection of cancer – either as Witness Role Models or Lay Health Advisors. They challenge women to take care of their health and that of their neighbors. They help people develop behaviors that focus on preventive health and appropriate medical care.

The Witnesses

Witnesses are women who are breast or cervical cancer survivors who witness, or talk about their cancer experiences.

Lay health advisors are volunteers who are not cancer survivors themselves but work with the project. They organize and publicize programs, network with community people, answer questions about services, and teach breast self-examination.

Together, they preach the good news that cancer doesn’t have to be an automatic death sentence. The key is to:

Witnesses are women who are breast or cervical cancer survivors who witness, or talk about their cancer experiences.

Lay health advisors are volunteers who are not cancer survivors themselves but work with the project. They organize and publicize programs, network with community people, answer questions about services, and teach breast self-examination.

Together, they preach the good news that cancer doesn’t have to be an automatic death sentence. The key is to:

Catch it early & get it treated!

Cervical cancer was once one of the most common causes of cancer death for American women. Then, between 1955 and 1992, the cervical cancer death rate declined by 74%. The main reason for this change was the increased use of the Pap test. This screening procedure can find changes in the cervix before cancer develops. It can also find cervical cancer early – in its most curable stage. The death rate from cervical cancer continues to decline by nearly 4% each year.

Breast cancer is the most common cancer in African American women, and the second leading cause of death among African American women exceeded only by lung cancer. African American women have a higher breast cancer death rate than women of any other racial or ethnic population. Although breast cancer incidence is lower among African Americans, studies show that mortality rates among African American women are 20 percent higher than white women.

Participation in annual mammography screening and treatment of the disease at its earliest stages offers the best opportunity for decreasing mortality and improving survival.

Breast Self-Exam

The best time to do a monthly breast self-exam is about 3 to 5 days after your period begins. Examine yourself at the same time each month. Your breasts are not as tender or lumpy at this time in your monthly cycle. Menopausal women need to do their exams on the same day each month as well.

Early Warning Signs & Symptoms

Early Warning Signs & Symptoms

Early Warning Signs & Symptoms

Our Mission

The Witness Project® is a culturally competent, community-based, breast and cervical cancer education program through which cancer survivors and lay health advisors increase awareness, knowledge, screening and early detection behaviors in women in an effort to reduce the mortality and morbidity from cancer.

The Witness Project is Good for Both Body and Soul

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